Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China

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In a kitchen, a father tries to teach his son about the art of the knife.

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Deboning a swamp eel.

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Then use the spine of the knife to beat the swamp eel.

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Tenderise.

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Dip it in hot oil.

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Add pork belly and garlic. Fry.

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Then add the swamp eel.

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Transfer the eel into a claypot.

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Simmer.

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炖生敲  stewed swamp eel

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响油鳝糊 “hot oil” stir-fried swamp eel

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梁溪脆鳝 Liangxi crispy and sweet swamp eel

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石锅软兜 claypot swamp eel

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Beijing, China

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A master chef is trying to recreate an old recipe with his students.

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This way of marinating meat has a history of over 300 years.

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Some recipes say that the pork belly needs to be marinated repeatedly over several days.

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Soybean paste diluted with water.

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After eight days of marinating, the pork will dry indoors for two to three months.

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Finally.

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The fatty meat and lean meat layers are distinct.

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Pork belly has another name in Chinese, 五花肉. It means “five-layered pork”. The five layers refer to: the skin, the layer of subcutaneous fat, the thin layer of lean meat, another layer of fat, and the deeper layer of lean meat.

五花肉.jpg

image source 

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清酱肉 pork belly in sweet bean paste

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清酱肉火锅   pork belly hot pot

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清酱肉炒蒿子秆  stir-fried pork belly with chrysanthemum carinatum

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清酱肉炒饭  fried rice with pork belly

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清酱肉饽饽   shortbread stuffed with pork belly

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Hong Kong, China

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Knowing how to combine various spices is another essential skill of a top-notch chef, besides mastering the art of the knife.

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Dip a chicken into stock at a temperature of 80 degrees Celsius.

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Simmer for 25 minutes.

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Pour premade sauce over the chicken.

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Marinate for 2 hours.

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十八味豉油鸡 “eighteen spices” soy sauce chicken

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Flower crab

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Sauce made from seaweed and clam.

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Add yellow wine.

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Steam.

Add egg.

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Sauté with chicken fat.

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Steam again.

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Add rice vermicelli.

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鸡油花雕蒸花蟹 flower crab steamed in chicken fat and yellow wine

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Green lemon.

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Add sea salt.

With enough time, it turns into this.

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Any kind of seafood.

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Add a bit of salted green lemon.

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And the dish immediately takes on a new character.

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咸柠檬蒸蛏子 steamed razor shells with salted green lemon

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Xiamen, Fujian Province, China

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The No. 8 Market in Xiamen takes up several blocks.

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All kinds of seafood are sold here.

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油煎带鱼 pan fried beltfish

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油煎黄鸡鱼 deep fried blue striped grunt

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小管枪乌贼 loligo oshimai, a type of squid

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白灼小管 steamed squid

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strips of dried radish

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Soy sauce, water

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There’s just enough soy sauce to cover the fish.

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This cooking method originated on fishing boats, where there were limited space and resources.

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酱油水黄翅鱼 yellowfin seabream in soy sauce

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But not every sea creature is seafood.

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弓斑东方鲀takifugu ocellatus

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Its blood and entrails are extremely poisonous.

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Meishan, Sichuan Province, China

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鸡血旺 “bloody tofu”, actually made with chicken blood and salt

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红烧鸡血旺 braised bloody tofu

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豆汤鸡血旺 bloody tofu in pea soup

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椒盐九肚鱼 deep-fried Bombay duck with chilli and garlic

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Besides these Sichuanese cuisine, the owner of the restaurant has hired a Cantonese chef, who creates some special dishes.

A bowl carved out of pumpkin?

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Chickens that look like they are about to engage in a fight.

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This is made by a Sichuanese chef.

洪雅笋子烧牛肉 braised beef with bamboo shoots

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This is made by a Cantonese chef.

青芥红葱爆澳牛 beef in mustard and shallots

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You can tell which dish comes from which chef just by the colouring of the food.  Most Sichuanese food has a distinctive reddish hue.

But to each his own. No matter which school the chef comes from, a good dish is a good dish.

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When the creativity of the chefs is combined, it leads to new dishes.

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椒盐土凤鱼 deep fried Chinese false gudgeon

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双椒雪花牛肉 beef in Sichuan peppercorn and chilli pepper

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Excuse me, it’s time for me to go and steal neighbour Auntie Wang’s stir-fried rice with beef and chilli sauce. The smell of her cooking has wafted into my living room.

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Join the conversation! 2 Comments

  1. very interesting information! .

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  2. Perfectly written subject material, Really enjoyed studying.

    Like

    Reply

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About fmiswriting

One out of 1.4 billion voices.

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